Motionless mobility

P. Bury, J. d’Imbleval, A. Kowalski, F. Morellet, Yvaral, J. R. Soto, A.Stempfel, I.Gouyon-Matignon, S.Kreitner, T.Nasseri, V.Vasarely

Exposition en coursDu 14 janvier au 4 mars

So here it is, in this exhibition on the theme of immobile mobility, the movement suggested but not consumed, will give free rein to our imagination. The work that we will fix in the greatest immobility, will play with our vision, and yet nothing moves, except our eyes. Have you ever had this strange feeling that something is moving, without being sure ?

Mobility, what characterizes our society, our way of being in the world, everyone knows or experiences it on a daily basis. There is a seductive side, positive in mobility, but also time-consuming, and a fatal outcome : stopping, immobility.

Standing still has a bad reputation, we have all experienced it in our flesh during the months of restrictions due to Covid. The striking stillness, like a suspension of time, and yet, time continued to flow, but lived as an eternity.

So here it is, in this exhibition on the theme of immobile mobility, the movement suggested but not consumed, will give free rein to our imagination. The work that we will fix in the greatest immobility, will play with our vision, and yet nothing moves, except our eyes. Have you ever had this strange feeling that something is moving, without being sure ?

In motionless mobility, there is like an incalculable space-time that moves, as if gigantic masses were moving, but seeing neither the beginning nor the end, everything seems static. "And yet it turns" dared Galileo in 1633 after having recanted his astronomical doctrines, speaking of the earth.

For some works, over a long period of time, we can detect a millimetric movement, one that we can only follow better if we refrain from staring at the work, and just come back to it a few seconds later.

Others will ask the viewer to participate in their discovery. He will no longer be a simple viewer, he will have to exercise his gaze to seek and find what the immobile work can offer him in motion.

Around this theme, we will find both the irritating works of Victor Vasarely and Jesus Raphael Soto, as well as those in distortion of Jean d’Imbleval, or even those enigmatic of Piotr Kowalski and Timo Nasseri. A moiré effect will stop us at Isabelle de Gouyon-Matignon and a visual sensation will captivate us at Yvaral. An unacknowledged suggestion will make us smile at the bend of a work by André Stempfel, but we will be overtaken by the erectile slowness of a sculpture by Pol Bury, or by the slowed-down movement of a Siegfried Kreitner. We will be able to stop in front of a frame by François Morellet who will not reveal its construction in the blink of an eye.

In conclusion, it’s a journey for the eye, a moment just for yourself, a visual sensation that makes you travel without moving. Good visit !

Vue expo rdc 1 immobile mobilité

Vue expo rdc 1 immobile mobilité

Vue expo rdc 2 immobile mobilité

Vue expo rdc 2 immobile mobilité

Vue expo 1er 1 immobile mobilité

Vue expo 1er 1 immobile mobilité

Vue expo 1er 2 immobile mobilité

Vue expo 1er 2 immobile mobilité

Motionless mobility. P. Bury, J. d’Imbleval, A. Kowalski, F. Morellet, Yvaral, J. R. Soto, A.Stempfel, I.Gouyon-Matignon, S.Kreitner, T.Nasseri, V.Vasarely